Other Named Storms 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 2022/23

Published on Thursday 1 September 2022

First introduced by Met Éireann and the Met Office (UK) in 2015, the Name our Storms campaign has helped raise awareness of the threat and impact of severe weather before it hits. Met Éireann and the Met Office were joined by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) in its fifth storm season 2019/20. The extremes observed during each storm of the season are given below. The background colours, in the table below, will indicate whether the station reached the forecast warning criteria (red, orange, yellow) - see bottom of page for more information.

The upcoming storm season runs from Thursday 1 September 2022 to Thursday 31 August 2023 (inclusive). The storm names this season are Antoni, Betty, Cillian, Daisy, Elliot, Fleur, Glen, Hendrika, Íde, Johanna, Khalid, Loes, Mark, Nelly, Owain, Priya, Ruadhán, Sam, Tobias, Val and Wouter.

Met Éireann Storm Names list 2022/23

Storm Name
Peak Impact Date
Named By
Highest sustained / mean wind speed Highest gust wind speed Highest 24-hr total rainfall Air temps range Lowest MSLP Highest individual wave
Antoni            
Betty            
Cillian            
Daisy            
Elliot            
Fleur            
Glen            
Hendrika            
Íde            
Johanna            
Khalid            
Loes            
Mark            
Nelly            
Owain            
Priya            
Ruadhán            
Sam            
Tobias            
Val            
Wouter            

The table above provides details of the extremes observed during each named storm, including a link (on the storm name) to the named storm statement. In general, red level storms will be analysed and the storm statement will be published here.

Forecast Warning Criteria

The warning colour coding system is explained on www.met.ie/weather-warnings and the warning colours are given above should that land-station reach the threshold. This is not a verification of the forecast, as the warning criteria may include other elements apart from a warning threshold.

Warnings Today Warnings Explained
Yellow. Not unusual weather. Localised danger.
Widespread sustained wind speeds > 50 km/h
Widespread wind gusts speeds > 90 km/h
Rainfall* > 30 mm in 24 hours
Orange. Infrequent. Dangerous/disruptive.
Widespread sustained speeds > 65 km/h
Widespread gusts speeds > 110 km/h
Rainfall* > 50 mm in 24 hours
Red. Rare. Extremely dangerous/destructive. Widespread sustained speeds > 80 km/h
Widespread gusts speeds > 130 km/h
Rainfall* > 80 mm in 24 hours

* Amounts can be up to double on windward upper slopes and impacts vary depending on, for example, soil moisture deficits.

Follow Met Éireann on @meteireann for warnings and forecasts; and @metclimate for the past climate of Ireland.

Definitions

  • Peak impact date is based upon the date of highest gust observed during the event.
  • Sustained wind speeds refer to average (10-minutes) land wind speeds, stored in database as knots.
  • Gust wind speeds refer to average (3-seconds) wind speeds, stored in database as knots.
  • Rainfall refers to rainfall total measured over 24 hours (mm).
  • MSLP refers to hourly mean sea level pressure (hPa).
  • Highest Individual Wave (m) is the height from trough to crest.
  • For buoy location information, see www.met.ie/forecasts/marine-inland-lakes/buoys/buoy-locations.